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name and portrait Michael Hundrieser


company Virtugraf
website name virtugraf
website url http://virtugraf.de
city and country Neufeld, Germany

personal statement

I got involved in photography in a secondary school "Photography" class. Though very basic and only black and white,  it caught my interest and has kept me bound all my life. My wife still remembers the darkroom we set up in our first apartment.

When I first saw an interactive spherical image in 2006 I was stunned and immediately knew that this was the kind of image I wanted to create. After a very steep learning curve, mostly self-taught, I found myself a member of the community of German panographers, where I am now active in forums and meetings.

My favorite subject is nature from a special viewpoint as well as tourism and archeology. I gave several lectures about interactive tours in the hotel business for a German hotel group. Since my second home is in Turkey, I love to document historical places that are beyond the touristic mainstream.

Printing 360° images is a challenge that I respond to by using various projection and unusual viewpoints. I created a special website, http://abstraktfoto.de just for this very exciting way of presenting photographs. These images are not for documentation- they are more graphic art.

Presenting spherical images in a circular frame is also a new and interesting field where I am active. This gives the visitor  a very special "bug" view, because it is a viewpoint no one normally sees, and the circular mounting underlines the 360° effect.

I participated in the printed "Spheric" exhibition 2006 in Dithmarschen, Schleswig-Holstein as well as

in various online exhibitions.

 


suggested panel layout none

first image
first image title Rose Grotto
first image subject A "bugs" view under a rose bush
first image place date Neufeld, Germany, late summer 2008
first image caption During a walk through the garden I saw light shining under this bush. The pink color and the green leaves in the very bright light attracted my interest. So I used my tabletop tripod and shot this photo. The extremely low position gave a "bugs-view" and the observer may feel like a little insect. Actually the bush is quite small — but it seems like a rose jungle in the image.

Technical note: Canon 40D with Sigma 8mm, self-made pano-head, Nodal-Ninja RD12 and a Manfrotto tabletop tripod. Stitched with Hugin, finalized with Pano2VR

second image
second image title The Dolmen "Brutkamp"
second image subject Inside a 5000 year old Dolmen
second image place date Albersdorf, Germany, summer 2009
second image caption A very historical place in the north of Germany. This Dolmen was build in approximately 3500 B.C. and used as cultural place to worship the god "Freya". It is constructed of erratic boulders from the ice-age, the biggest weighs about 23 tons. Actually you cannot go into this particular dolmen, there is no entry into it. The camera was positioned on a tabletop tripod and then pushed under the dolmen with a rod. Turning was also accomplished with the rod which made it a little tricky.

The view to the Zenith is marvelous, with 23 tons of erratic boulder just centimeters above you. This is a viewpoint not available to anyone and you really feel the prehistoric times around you.
Technical note: Canon 5D with Tokina ATX 107 @ 12mm, self-made pano-head, Nodal-Ninja RD12 and a Manfrotto tabletop tripod. Stitched with Hugin, finalized with Pano2VR.


third image
third image title Tulips Polar
third image subject Tulips
third image place date Neufeld, Germany, spring 2007
third image caption This is a "gandma's bed", which means an old grandmother, around 82 years of age, is caring for the plants. When I asked for permission to shoot, she was very anxious that I not crease or step on any of them. The blue sky gives a perfect background for the yellow and red tulips, and the barn is nicely in the background as are the leafless trees. The house is behind the barn, so it does not interfere with the image.

The "Little Planet" projection makes the view even more interesting, emphasizing ervery single object in the image.
Technical note: Canon 40D with Sigma 8mm, self-made pano-head, Nodal-Ninja RD12 and a Manfrotto tabletop tripod. Stitched with Hugin, finalized with Pano2VR

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